Book Box Review and Unboxing: The Nocturnal Reader’s Box – May – Corporate Overlords

Well, after a whole lot of delivery company drama, my May Nocturnal Reader’s Box has finally arrived (yay!). I’ve been looking forward to this one since the twisted souls who put the box together every month dropped some hints about what would be included for May. (And those same evil people have been teasing the June box for about two months now, and I am actually  salivating)

So let’s get down to business. The featured book this month is Borne by Jeff VanderMeer. 

Here’s the Goodreads description:

In a ruined, nameless city of the future, a woman named Rachel, who makes her living as a scavenger, finds a creature she names “Borne” entangled in the fur of Mord, a gigantic, despotic bear. Mord once prowled the corridors of the biotech organization known as the Company, which lies at the outskirts of the city, until he was experimented on, grew large, learned to fly and broke free. Driven insane by his torture at the Company, Mord terrorizes the city even as he provides sustenance for scavengers like Rachel.

At first, Borne looks like nothing at all—just a green lump that might be a Company discard. The Company, although severely damaged, is rumoured to still make creatures and send them to distant places that have not yet suffered Collapse.

Borne somehow reminds Rachel of the island nation of her birth, now long lost to rising seas. She feels an attachment she resents; attachments are traps, and in this world any weakness can kill you. Yet when she takes Borne to her subterranean sanctuary, the Balcony Cliffs, Rachel convinces her lover, Wick, not to render Borne down to raw genetic material for the drugs he sells—she cannot break that bond.

Wick is a special kind of supplier, because the drug dealers in the city don’t sell the usual things. They sell tiny creatures that can be swallowed or stuck in the ear, and that release powerful memories of other people’s happier times or pull out forgotten memories from the user’s own mind—or just produce beautiful visions that provide escape from the barren, craterous landscapes of the city.

Against his better judgment, out of affection for Rachel or perhaps some other impulse, Wick respects her decision. Rachel, meanwhile, despite her loyalty to Wick, knows he has kept secrets from her. Searching his apartment, she finds a burnt, unreadable journal titled “Mord,” a cryptic reference to the Magician (a rival drug dealer) and evidence that Wick has planned the layout of the Balcony Cliffs to match the blueprint of the Company building. What is he hiding? Why won’t he tell her about what happened when he worked for the Company?

Sounds pretty cool, right? Oh, and did I mention that the book comes with a signed bookplate?

The second book is Normal by Warren Ellis

From Goodreads:

Some people call it “abyss gaze.” Gaze into the abyss all day and the abyss will gaze into you.

There are two types of people who think professionally about the future: foresight strategists are civil futurists who think about geo-engineering and smart cities and ways to evade Our Coming Doom; strategic forecasters are spook futurists, who think about geopolitical upheaval and drone warfare and ways to prepare clients for Our Coming Doom. The former are paid by nonprofits and charities, the latter by global security groups and corporate think tanks.

For both types, if you’re good at it, and you spend your days and nights doing it, then it’s something you can’t do for long. Depression sets in. Mental illness festers. And if the “abyss gaze” takes hold there’s only one place to recover: Normal Head, in the wilds of Oregon, within the secure perimeter of an experimental forest.

When Adam Dearden, a foresight strategist, arrives at Normal Head, he is desperate to unplug and be immersed in sylvan silence. But then a patient goes missing from his locked bedroom, leaving nothing but a pile of insects in his wake. A staff investigation ensues; surveillance becomes total. As the mystery of the disappeared man unravels in Warren Ellis’s Normal, Dearden uncovers a conspiracy that calls into question the core principles of how and why we think about the future—and the past, and the now.

Doomsday seems a bit close for comfort lately, but I’m always up for some speculative fiction! 

And now we come to the goodies! As ever we get a pin (velociraptor, sweet!), and this month’s box includes two bookmarks, one from The Dark Tower series and one from The Southern Reach trilogy, which was also written by this month’s featured author, Jeff VanderMeer. 

Also included was charcoal soap from  the Paper Street Soap Co., in “Tyler Durden” scent (I was a bit nervous at first, but it’s quite pleasant)

A journal (Yay! What? I don’t have a problem, I swear) in a Southern Reach theme

And, as always a lovely custom art print, this one from The Dark Tower (now framed and hanging proudly in my house)

But the last two items really made my day:

A set of Ingen branded socks (I still love rereading Jurassic Park!)

And (squeeeeee) a towel with “Don’t Panic” embroidered on it!

Which, clearly, will have to start traveling with me. You know, just in case.

So if you haven’t already, you really should go to http://www.thenocturnalreadersbox.com/ and check out The Nocturnal Reader’s Box for yourself. I have to say that by far, this is one of the most consistently satisfying book boxes I’ve tried. Can’t wait for next month!

Book Box Review and Unboxing: The Nocturnal Reader’s April Box: Trapped

It’s that time again! This month’s theme for The Nocturnal Reader’s Box was “Trapped,” and explored all the various iterations of that theme in horror literature.

First things first. The two books this month are:

Little Heaven by Nick Cutter (yay!) Here’s the Goodreads description:

An all-new epic tale of terror and redemption set in the hinterlands of midcentury New Mexico from the acclaimed author of The Troop—which Stephen King raved “scared the hell out of me and I couldn’t put it down…old-school horror at its best.”

From electrifying horror author Nick Cutter comes a haunting new novel, reminiscent of Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian and Stephen King’s It, in which a trio of mismatched mercenaries is hired by a young woman for a deceptively simple task: check in on her nephew, who may have been taken against his will to a remote New Mexico backwoods settlement called Little Heaven. Shortly after they arrive, things begin to turn ominous. Stirrings in the woods and over the treetops—the brooding shape of a monolith known as the Black Rock casts its terrible pall. Paranoia and distrust grips the settlement. The escape routes are gradually cut off as events spiral towards madness. Hell—or the closest thing to it—invades Little Heaven. The remaining occupants are forced to take a stand and fight back, but whatever has cast its dark eye on Little Heaven is now marshaling its powers…and it wants them all.

And Suffer the Children by Craig DiLouie 

Suffer the Children presents a terrifying tale of apocalyptic fiction, as readers are introduced to Herod’s Syndrome, a devastating illness that suddenly and swiftly kills all young children across the globe. Soon, they return from the grave…and ask for blood. And with blood, they stop being dead. They continue to remain the children they once were…but only for a short time, as they need more blood to live. The average human body holds ten pints of blood, so the inevitable question for parents everywhere becomes: How far would you go to bring your child back?

I’ve been looking forward to Nick Cutter’s new book, and Suffer the Children sounds horrifying (not a big child fan to begin with).

In addition there was a ton of cool stuff, such as a Stephen King pin, and a Shutter Island matchbox . . . 

A chapbook called 120 Seconds of Light by JE Smith 

 A Lord of the Flies themed tote bag

A wicked cool and creepy 3D art print, 

And probably my favorite part of the box: a pint glass from The Overlook Hotel of The Shining fame. 

As always, I have nothing but praise for this box. The amount of stuff you get for your money is unreal,  and it’s so wonderful to find a book box not solely for the teenage set. Boxes go quick, but you should totally head over to their website and start up a subscription.