Book Review: The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King

the beekeepers apprentice

The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King

I’m continuing my Sherlockian trend with the first of this series by Laurie R. King!

Sherlock Holmes has retired from the life of a consulting detective to keep bees and indulge in chemistry experiments in the Sussex Downs. Mary Russell is a teenage orphan, forced to live with her penurious aunt until her majority. When the two chance to meet, Holmes is not expecting to encounter a mind equal to his, and Mary Russell is not expecting to find a mentor. This first book chronicles the first four years of their friendship.

This is the first in a series which now contains fourteen books. I’m definitely late to the party. Like most of the other Sherlock Holmes stuff I’m reading lately, the choice was inspired by From Holmes to Sherlock by Mattias Boström. The book is a series of interconnected vignettes rather than one contiguous story. In The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, we move from Mary and Sherlock’s first meeting, to their strange friendship, and the beginning of Mary’s training in the art of detection.

In Mary Russell, King has given us a heroine who is fiercely intelligent and independent, and more than a match for Holmes himself. I loved that while she shares a lot of Holmes’ personality traits, the two complement one another rather than existing as mirror-image duplicates. As with any new series, there is always the awkward getting-to-know-you period. But this is a great start to a series, and I’m quite looking forward to binging on the rest of the series.

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Book Review: A Conspiracy in Belgravia by Sherry Thomas


A Conspiracy in Belgravia by Sherry Thomas

This is the second Lady Sherlock book by Sherry Thomas. You should naturally expect spoilers for the first book, A Study in Scarlet Women in this review. If you haven’t yet read the first book, stop what you’re doing and read it now. I’ll wait.

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I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the first book featuring Charlotte Holmes. Rather than the trite gender-swapped rehashing of the well-trod Sherlock Holmes stories, I found a smart, witty, and wonderfully realized mystery featuring not Sherlock Holmes, but a woman whose brilliant deductive mind is trapped in the body of a Victorian society lady,mwith all the attendant limitations and societal entrapment.

The second book in the series does not disappoint. Taking place shortly after the first book leaves off, we find Charlotte settling into the life of a social pariah, and enjoying the freedom that comes with being “Sherlock Holmes.” Things go a bit sideways when she is approached by the wife of Lord Ingram, her childhood friend, who is trying to track down her first love. Beyond the obvious conflicts of investigating the case without the knowledge of Lord Ingram, the further Charlotte digs into the identity and history of Lady Ingram’s former paramour, the more strangely complicated matters become. Soon Charlotte finds herself embroiled in hidden ciphers, codes within codes, blackmail plots, poisoning, and espionage. Weaving these disparate threads into a resolution will tax even her brilliant mind.

Charlotte Holmes is simply a great character. She is by no means a female stand-in for the great detective, rather it’s as if Thomas grew her from scratch; a brilliant and analytical mind on par with Sherlock Holmes, but within a person who has had to grow up adhering (to a greater or lesser degree) the societal expectations for a nineteenth-century lady of breeding. Thomas also continues to develop the characters of Mrs. Watson, Lord Ingram, Inspector Treadle, and Charlotte’s older sister, Livia. Though the supporting characters don’t get as much attention as Charlotte, there were several excellent subplots throughout the book. I was especially impressed with the characterization of Inspector Treadle, an honorable and forthright man, trying to come to grips with the existence of women who seek a measure of independence. This could easily have turned into some cliche or overdone condemnation of weak-minded men, but instead we see Treadles honestly wrestling with himself and his preconceptions.

Fans of historical mysteries, Sherlock Holmes, and the like should check out this series. If you enjoyed A Study in Scarlet Women you will likely enjoy this book as well. I cannot wait to see what Thomas does in future books in this series.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: The House of Silk by Anthony Horowitz

 The House of Silk by Anthony Horowitz
This book has been drifting around my TBR for a bit. But after my recent read of From Holmes to Sherlock by Mattias Boström, I find myself moving any and all Sherlock Holmes stories up on my to-read list. This book is significant because is is one of the only stories to win the seal of approval from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s estate, his heirs being determined to jealously preserve the Holmes mystique. So with all that in mind, there’s a lot of pressure on Horowitz to deliver not only a good mystery, but also a Sherlock Holmes mystery.

The story begins in typical fashion, with Holmes and Watson (visiting his old friend while his wife is away) sitting in their respective chairs by the fire. Sherlock delivers his usual uncannily accurate observations on Watson’s recent activities. Watson, per usual is totally flabbergasted until the requisite explanation is offered. From there we delve into a multifaceted mystery encompassing stolen artwork, Irish gangs, Pinkerton Detectives, and threats to the Baker Street Irregulars. 

Horowitz is careful to include many of the common elements from Conan Doyle’s stories. The House of Silk, written for a modern audience, is darker and more violent than the original stories. Horowitz, not needing to contend with Victorian sensibilities, is able to lay out what Doyle only hinted at. In all, though, this is a well done addition to the Holmes canon. Fans of Sherlock Homes (duh) or Victorian mysteries should add this book to their to-read lists.

Book Review: From Holmes to Sherlock by Mattias Boström

from holmes to sherlock

From Holmes to Sherlock: The Story of the Men and Women Who Created an Icon by Mattias Boström

Sherlock Holmes has been a cultural icon on both sides of the Atlantic since his first appearance in Study in Scarlet in the 1887 Beeton’s Christmas Annual. The famous consulting detective has occupied nearly every aspect of popular culture; from magazines, to books, to comic strips, to Broadway musicals, to movies and television shows. Sherlock Holmes has fought criminal masterminds, spectral hounds, nazis, Jack the Ripper, eldritch horrors, and vampires. His name and his legend have taken on quite a life of their own, and Holmes seems to exist almost entirely separate from the man who created him.

In From Holmes to Sherlock, Boström takes us from young Arthur Conan Doyle taking studious notes in lecture with Dr. Joseph Bell at the University of Edinburgh, through to the modern hit BBC television series Sherlock, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman. The century and a half span encompasses two world wars, the Great Depression, the advent of radio, the golden age of Hollywood, and the ubiquity of television. We see Conan Doyle trying desperately to rein in a creation that broke free from his control even in the earliest days. We see his heirs try desperately to retain some aspect of their father’s greatest work. We see how the world has made Sherlock Holmes their own, through countless books, movies, plays, and dedicated societies.

This is a must-read for any fans of Sherlock Holmes. Boström has written a comprehensive and fascinating history of one of the most popular fictional characters of all time. The book is rich in detail and engagingly told, and should not be missed by anyone who wants more information about the world’s greatest consulting detective.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher via Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.

 

Book Review: A Study in Scarlet Women by Sherry Thomas

A Study in Scarlet Women (Lady Sherlock, #1)

A Study in Scarlet Women by Sherry Thomas

 

Charlotte Holmes has a brilliant analytical mind. Unfortunately, as a society woman in Victorian England, the outlets for her brilliance are few and far between. Her parents expect her to be perfectly respectable, and not to scare off potential suitors with her uncanny powers of observation and deduction. Seeking an independent life out from under her parents’ thumb, Charlotte concocts a scheme to take herself off the marriage market permanently. Unfortunately, things go awry and Charlotte finds herself a social pariah. She now has her independence, but little else besides her considerable wits and the clothes on her back.

And then, naturally, death. Three upstanding members of society are dead, in different parts of the country, from different causes. When Charlotte, writing under the nom de plume Sherlock, writes to the police, pointing out the suspicious nature of all three deaths, the interconnectedness of the families involved, and the likelihood of poison as the true cause of death, she unwittingly causes the suspicion for committing the murders to fall upon her sister and father. Charlotte must now use her unusual talents to uncover the identity of the real murderer in order to save her family. With the help of a childhood friend, Lord Ingram, lively widow Mrs. Watson, and police inspector Treadles, Charlotte is on the case!

I was hesitant to read this book at first. I love the idea of a gender-swapped Sherlock Holmes, but I kept envisioning all the horrible ways such an endeavor could go wrong. I began this book with a healthy amount of skepticism, and I’m delighted to say that I was pretty much completely wrong! The strength of this book is that Sherry Thomas did not take the story “A Study in Scarlet”, or the character of Sherlock Holmes, and simply insert a woman into the assigned places. Thomas has made a story, and a character, completely separate from the original Holmes and his stories, yet bearing enough nods to the original to please a hardcore fan (like me).

Charlotte Holmes is blonde and cherubic. Her vice is not cocaine or hours of sawing on the violin, but fine food and plum cake. Her demeanor is very Sherlockian, though this Miss Holmes, being a woman, has had to curb the sarcasm and sharp edges Sherlock was entitled to. Additionally, investigating a murder as a woman in Victorian England is no small feat. Charlotte must be constantly inventive in order to continue her investigation and maintain the illusion of “Sherlock Holmes” to the public and to the police.

In all, Sherry Thomas does a great job in making this story her own. She also highlights the roadblocks a brilliant woman would face in Victorian England should she attempt to do anything considered to be “unwomanly”. Thomas’ characters are interesting and her plot misdirects and folds back on itself admirably. I wound up quite liking the character of Charlotte Holmes, and I can’t wait to read her further adventures.

An advance ebook was provided by Berkley Publishing Group in exchange for an honest review. “A Study in Scarlet Women” will be available for purchase on October 18th, 2016.