Book Review: The Man Upon the Stair by Gary Inbinder

The Man Upon the Stair by Gary Inbinder

This is the third book in Inbinder’s Inspector Lefebvre series. There’s probably going to be spoilers for the first two books here. The good news is that while it is definitely better to read the books as a series, you could probably read this book as a standalone without too much trouble.

Achille Lefebvre has just been promoted to Chief Inspector following his successful foiling of an anarchist plot to assassinate a high ranking foreign offical with a new type of bomb. When the bomber meets his fate at the guillotine, Lefebvre is told that his compatriots have targeted him for revenge. In the midst of this, a high ranking member of the aristocracy, Baron de Livet has gone missing. Trying to uncover the Baron’s fate, Lefebvre uncovers easy connections between his missing person and the Russian government. As the conspiracy grows deeper, Lefebvre must use all his considerable intelligence and skills to safeguard himself and his family, and to prevent an international incident.

I received all three Inspector Lefebvre books as a bundle, and powered through the series in a matter of days. These books are entertaining historical mysteries, featuring an intelligent, forward-looking detective, intelligent women (good and evil), fascinating historical detail, and cameos by famous (real) historical figures. Inbinder provides us with enticing mysteries, and a cast of characters to root for and against. I loved how carefully Inbinder used historical details to firmly plant his stories in realistic ground.

The Man Upon the Stair combines historical mystery with political thriller. International intrigue and good old fashioned murder combine to set teetering a nation (and continent) already on the brink of war. The story is richly detailed and beautifully woven. Inbinder is clearly passionate about his subject and that enthusiasm shows through in his stories.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review.


Book Review: Dunbar by Edward St. Aubyn

Dunbar by Edward St. Aubyn

Hogarth Shakespeare is taking the Bard’s classic stories and updating them for modern readers. I loved Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood (The Tempest) and New Boy by Tracy Chevalier (Othello). Dunbar is a recent offering, retelling King Lear in light of cutthroat capitalism and private wealth.

Here, the eponymous king takes the form of Henry Dunbar, influential media magnate and wealthy beyond all reason. When Dunbar decides he is tired of the responsibility of his position, he hands the company over to his two eldest (and amoral and psychotic) daughters, Abigail and Megan. The two promptly stick dear old dad in a remote insane asylum and plot to gut the company and squeeze its corpse for cold hard cash. With the help of an alcoholic former comedian and his youngest daughter, Florence (written out of the will for rejecting the Dunbar wealth), Henry Dunbar must struggle back into the “real” world to save his Empire.

This reimagining of Shakespeare’s tragedy is perfect in this day and age. Henry Dunbar is not someone to admire. He is temperamental, vicious, and (as a comedian whose name I cannot recall once said) “ruin the oceans rich.” Basically, he is someone who has never had to consider the lives and views of others until suddenly everything is taken away from him and he himself is below consideration. By the time we meet him, he is struggling to extricate himself from the hell his daughters have left him in, and he is more a figure of pity, not necessarily because of redemption in his narrative, but in the bringing low of a human being.

This is a tragedy, and if you’re familiar with the original, there will be few surprises in store. Instead, St. Aubyn has concentrated his efforts on bringing us a fable about the hazards of greed, and the value of things which money cannot buy.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher via Blogging for Books in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: The Unkillable Kitty O’Kane by Colin Falconer

The Unkillable Kitty O’Kane by Colin Falconer

At the turn of the twentieth century, Kitty O’Kane grows up poor in the slums of Dublin, Ireland, enduring beatings from her drunken father and dreaming of a better life. She gets herself out of her old life and into service with the prestigious White Star line. She is able to secure a position as a stewardess on the line’s newest and largest ship: the Titanic. And so starts the saga of the Unkillable Kitty O’Kane. After becoming romantically involved with a firebrand journalist, Kitty dives into the fight for the poor, the disenfranchised, and for women’s sufferage. She bears witness to the some of the most calamitous and tumultuos events of the early twentieth century. Through Kitty’s eyes we experience the sinking of the Lusitania, the Russian Revolution, and the start of The Troubles in Ireland.

Kitty spends much of the book lamending her past. She ties herself early on to the increasingly erratic reporter, and pines for Tom Doyle, a young boy from her childhood in Dublin who has since grown into a handsome young doctor in London. And this is the crux of the problem for the book. Romance and love triangles are all well and good, but Kitty’s relationship with the men in her life completely takes over any true agency she might have had.

Yes, she witnesses the October Revolution in Russia, but she is only there because the journalist, Lincoln, has dragged her there. She wants to be a journalist herself, but lacks the courage to write in her own words, and rather follows Lincoln’s lead in all her writing. She eschews becoming a wife and mother in favor of adventure and activist (a decision I applaud) yet will not picture a life with her “true love” Tom Doyle that does not adhere to traditional relationships. She may be The Unkillable Kitty O’Kane, survivor of two shipwrecks, Russian snipers, and British armaments, but she is only that by accident, or by someone else’s agency. She is on a quest to better the lives of women in the world, but the author doesn’t let her make an attempt except by the side of a man.

So, the historical aspects of this book were lovely, and Kitty’s insertion into actual historical events, and her meeting with real historical people is well done. But I found Kitty’s lack of agency, and her dependence on an increasingly erratic Lincoln to be frustrating, and runs counter to the plot of a book that emphasized the personal strength and growth of a woman born with nothing who makes something of herself.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: Will Save the Galaxy for Food by Yahtzee Croshaw

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Will Save the Galaxy for Food by Yahtzee Croshaw

Like a lot of people, I discovered Yahtzee Croshaw via his incredibly funny animated video game review, Zero Punctuation. Croshaw has a biting wit, incisive comments, and ridiculous visuals to accompany his reviews, which are delivered snarkily with barely pause for breath. When I later learned that he had written actual books, I quickly picked up Jam (a silly and fun take on the apocalypse) and Mogworld (a frankly brilliant look at everything that’s wrong with MMOs). Will Save the Galaxy for Food is Croshaw’s latest, and keeps up with his snarky cultural commentary.

The story finds our protagonist living a down-and-out existence on the moon. Ever since Quantum Tunneling made interstellar travel safe and instantaneous, demand for space pilots, even ones that have saved entire planets, has simply vanished. Living day to day scrounging for space tourists is demeaning, but what else can you do? When a fat paycheck falls into his lap, he figures that nearly anything is worth the money. Unfortunately, the job involves flying around the spoiled son of an Earth mobster, while having to pretend to be Jacques McKeown, a greasy bastard who turned the true stories of space pilots into pulp novels of derring-do, and who is universally despised by pilots across the black. Naturally every goes wrong, and our hero is thrown against space pirates, casual violence, upstart societies, political intrigue, man-eating aliens, and deadly hitmen.

The book was fantastically funny and delightful fun. Zaniness abounds as the pilot and his cohorts scramble from one adventure to another. The background given for the story is rich with references to problems we face in our own time. In fact, you need look no further than the brutish and devious Mr. Henderson, the Terran mobster (for lack of a better term) who hires the protagonist. Mr. Henderson is an insanely rich, casually violent, orange-skinned shady businessman prone to over indulging his spoiled, not-the-brightest-bulb son (now why does this sound a bit familiar?)

But no need to get too caught up in politics, or my projecting American problems onto a British-Australian writer’s story. Will Save the Galaxy for Food is simply fun. If you’re a fan of A. Lee Martinez, Douglas Adams, or Christopher Moore, you will find this book to be the perfect read for bringing yourself out of a reality-induced funk.

Book Review: Prudence and Imprudence by Gail Carriger


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Prudence and Imprudence by Gail Carriger

Okay, these books are pretty much a sequel to Carriger’s Parasol Protectorate series, so if you haven’t read those books, you probably aren’t going to get a lot out of them. However, you really should read that series, it is one of the best examples of paranormal-steampunk out there. But for now, if you keep reading, there’s going to be spoilers for the Parasol Protectorate series.


So I was a huge fan of the previous books featuring Alexia Tarabotti and Lord Conall Maccon. Carriger manages to give us stuffy Victorians, steampunk gadgets, werewolves, vampires, and tea fanatics, and make the entire thing funny, entertaining, and (most astonishingly) not ridiculous.

Prudence and Imprudence continue the story two decades later, featuring (naturally) Alexia and Conall’s metanatural daughter, Prudence (though she prefers to go by Rue). Having been raised by a combination of her werewolf father, preternatural mother, and vampire spy master Lord Akeldama, Rue has had anything but the typical Victorian childhood. Fortunately, Rue is her mother’s daughter and thrives in the atypical. When Lord Akeldama presents Rue with her very own Dirigible for her birthday, she naturally takes to the skies with her best friends Percy and Primrose Tunstell, and Quesnel leFoux. Through the two books, she travels to first India and then Egypt, her time heavy with the style of adventures Alexia Tarabotti would have dived into in her day.

It is always hard to continue a series in the same world, but with new characters. People inevitably long for the good old days with the characters they know and love. Carriger does a great job of modernizing her story (to the 1890s, let’s not get crazy), and keeping enough of the old guard about to make the entry into Rue’s world both novel and satisfying (it doesn’t hurt that there are so many ageless characters to choose from). It is gratifying to see what became of some of our favorites in the intervening two decades, but Carriger keeps the focus on the newest generation, and does a wonderful job of it. Rue is definitely her mother’s daughter, though she would never admit it. Seeing Ivy’s twins grown up and rebellious in their own ways is fun. And of course, we have our requisite bad boy in Quesnel leFoux.

What I especially like in this series is Carriger’s willingness to tackle the dark sides of the Victorian era. She deals frankly (though in a steampunk fantasy way) with the violence the British wrought in India and their other colonies, and with the Victorian tendency to see people other than themselves as less than human. Rue marches straight into the teeth of these issues, and the books are the better for it. So many Victorian-era books glide over the problems with the era. I’m not opposed to romanticism on the face of it, but these books came through like a breath of fresh air.

If you were a fan of the Parasol Protectorate series, you should definitely check these books out. If you haven’t read the first series of books, this review is probably highly confusing. Go read ’em!

Book Review: Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch

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Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch

This is the first book in the Peter Grant series. I was recommended this series by a friend of mine, who knew I’d been meaning to start The Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher. Note to self: book shopping after talking with friends during a long night at the bar can be dangerous.

Peter Grant is a fresh new constable with the London Metropolitan Police. He seems to be your average constable destined for average desk work until one night, while guarding a crime scene, he has a chat with a ghost. This odd ability brings him to the attention of one Chief Inspector Nightingale, and Grant suddenly finds himself swept into a world where magic is real and very, very dangerous.

I really enjoyed this book. I still haven’t read The Dresden Files (my bookworm friends will understand the unstable sand that is a TBR list), but from what I know of the series, this is built in the same vein. As always, first books always have the awkward getting-to-know-you-and-the-worldscape stage, but Aaronovitch manages to get through that with a minimum of sacrifice for pacing. There is a good amount of action, and quite a few scenes that were genuinely creepy. Add that to the fact that the book is so firmly set in London that you can follow the action on Google Earth (I absolutely did this), and this is vastly entertaining, incredibly realistic fantasy read.

Fans of Jim Butcher, Kevin Hearne, and other urban fantasy series should absolutely check this out. The best part is, since I’m coming onto this series late, I can binge!


Book Review: A Treacherous Curse by Deanna Raybourn

A Treacherous Curse by Deanna Raybourn

This is the third book in the Veronica Speedwell series. Naturally there will be spoilers for the first two books in the review below. Don’t forget to check out my reviews of A Curious Beginning and A Perilous Undertaking.


After the adventures of the past two books, Veronica and Stoker have eased in to a unique sort of friendship. Kept busy cataloguing the vast (and strange) collections of the Earl of Rosemorran, who hopes to turn his family’s collection of oddities into a museum. When a cursed Egyptian expedition, complete with mysterious deaths and disappearances, makes the tabloids, irrepressible Veronica can’t resist getting involved, especially once it becomes clear that Stoker has a dark past with one of the curse’s victims. With scandal threatening to undo her friend, Veronica wades into the breach, determined to prove Stoker’s innocence.

Deana Rayboun continues her comedic-romantic-Victorian-mystery series in fine form. She provides plenty of ribald humor, sexual tension, and a juicy mystery. By this point in the series, we are well beyond the awkward introduction portion, and can simply sit back and enjoy watching the characters bounce off one another. In A Treacherous Curse, we get to see the relationship between Veronica and Stoker deepen and mature (possibly the wrong word choice here) as Stoker’s past comes back to threaten him in the present. Though I’ll confess that it took me a bit to warm up to her, Raybourn has quite a fun, strong character in Veronica Speedwell. Here is a woman who knows what she wants and society be damned. 

Fans of the first two books will enjoy this continuation of the series. Anyone looking for an atypical Victorian mystery series should add this to their TBR.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

Book Review: Boneseeker by Brynn Chapman

Boneseeker by Brynn Chapman 

So Arabella Holmes (daughter of Sherlock) and Henry Watson (son of John) practice forensic anthropology at the Mütter Museum in Philadelphia. How could I resist?! I love any halfway decent Sherlock story, the Mütter Museum is frankly fascinating, and forensic anthropology is (as the kids say) my jam.  

Now, I didn’t go into this expecting a literary masterpiece. I wanted nothing more than a good time. Unfortunately, the book was simply not for me. The trouble begins when we find out that our leading lady is being targeted by Darwinists for seeking out the remains of a nephilim (Angel offspring, watch the Prophecy movies). There have certainly been plenty of Holmes-supernatural crossovers, but the character (even when dealing with offspring) carries a certain expectation of a scientific approach. Coming in with Holmes’ daughter talking about Angel skeletons is a bit off-putting.

And then, we enter into the angst-ridden “I love him/her but we can never be together” portion of YA fiction almost immediately. While I like angsty romance in single serving portions, cracking that egg open within the first twenty pages is simply more teen angst than I can handle.

So, this book is likely aimed at an audience younger than me. At my advanced age, some of the idiosyncrasites of the YA genre just don’t appeal as much as previously. 

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 

Book Review: Shallow Graves by Maureen Boyle

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Shallow Graves: The Hunt for the New Bedford Highway Serial Killer by Maureen Boyle

In 1988, the bodies of women began to turn up along the highways outside of New Bedford, Massachusetts. The town had begun as a whaling hub, then changed its industry over to textiles when whaling began to wane. Frederick Douglass had once been a resident of the town, and Moby Dick was based on whaling ships heading out of town. By the 1980s, however, New Bedford was struggling with that near universal blight: drugs and crime. Many of the victims (eleven in all) were troubled women, drug addicts, prostitutes, or both. The pool of potential suspects was vast, from fishermen to white collar workers to itinerant truckers. Nearly all the victims were found months after their bodies had been dumped, and modern forensic science as we now know it was in its infancy.

This is a mystery that remains an ongoing puzzle to this day. Boyle, one of the reporters who first broke the story in 1988, presents the facts to us in an organized, thorough manner. You can tell that this mystery has remained on her mind and in her heart for thirty years. Boyle generally leaves herself out of the narrative, focusing on the investigators, the victims and their families, the suspects, and the local politics. This is a true crime story written against the backdrop of a town in decline, but trying desperately to reinvent itself amidst its troubles. This should resonate strongly with many of us in this day and age, as the specter of heroin abuse and urban/suburban decay continue to blight many communities in this country.

Fans of true crime will enjoy this strong entry to the genre. Even if you don’t usually gravitate towards crime novels, Boyle’s portrayal of New Bedford in the 1980s is worth reading in and of itself.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.


Book Review: Life and Death in the Andes by Kim McQuarrie

Life and Death in the Andes: On the Trail of Bandits, Heroes, and Revolutionaries by Kim McQuarrie
The Andes mountain range in South America runs down the west coast of the continent. The stories and histories of the place are as varied as the peaks themselves. In Life and Death in the Andes, Kim McQuarrie gives us a travelogue and a history book, a sweeping epic and an intimate portrait. 

From the cities of Columbia to southernmost Chile and Argentina, McQuarrie brings us stories of druglords and mummies, weavers and bandits, natives and revolutionaries. Mixing history seamlessly with his own travels, Life and Death in the Andes gives us a unique perspective of life in the Andes mountains. 

History buffs, world travelers, and the curious will find a lot to like in McQuarrie’s easy conversational style. Anyone who wants to go a bit off the beaten trail will enjoy the stories McQuarrie has to tell us.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review.