Book Review: The Inkblots by Damion Searls

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The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and The Power of Seeing by Damion Searles

In 1917, Hermann Rorschach, brilliant Swiss psychiatrist and amateur artist, invented a test that would redefine the field of psychology, and would in time become synonymous with the strengths and the weaknesses of the field.

Rorschach sought to go beyond the work of contemporaries Freud and Jung with his (in)famous inkblots. Rorschach believed that while people could alter or mask what they said, they could not alter what they saw. Rorschach developed the blots as a way of plumbing the depths of the human psyche, the test would reveal the workings of the inner mind by revealing how people perceived external images.

Searls’ book is a comprehensive history of both the test and the man who invented it. From Rorschach’s occasionally less-than-ideal childhood in Switzerland, to his coming of age in medical school, his tempestuous marriage to a Russian doctor, and his early death shortly after publishing his inkblot study. We meet a brilliant and creative man, the son of artists, who sought to excel at everything he did, whether at art, music, or medicine. We learn about his careful crafting of the blots themselves, about the planning and execution involved in making the cards both suggestive and abstract at the same time.

The book also details the rise and fall of the Rorschach as a psychological test after its creator’s death. From its height in the 1940s and 1950s, to its decline in the anti-establishment 1960s, to its emergence as a pop-culture staple.

This book is an intriguing look at a fascinating scientist and the test which bears his name. The book is strongest when dealing with Rorschach himself. The controversy surrounding the test later in the 20th century are given a drier treatment. While fascinating, this section of the book lacks something that was present in the first part.

In all this is a great book for history buffs or psychology fans. The subject matter is truly interesting, but the dryness of the later half of the book might make this a bit tougher on the average lay reader.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher via LibraryThing in exchange for an honest review. Inkblots will be available for purchase on February 21st, 2017.

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